Clemens Is Found Not Guilty in Perjury TrialRoger Clemens, who intimidated even the toughest batters while becoming one of the best pitchers in baseball history, was acquitted Monday of all charges that he lied to Congress in 2008 when he insisted he never used steroids or human growth hormone during his long career. The verdict, which came on the second full day of deliberations in United States District Court, was a significant defeat for the government in its second failed attempt at convicting Mr. Clemens and will most likely fuel criticism of government prosecutors for investing time and money in cases involving athletes accused of doping.As the six counts of not guilty were announced in the packed courtroom, Mr. Clemens bit his lip and appeared to wipe tears from his eyes. After the judge said, “Mr. Clemens, you are free to go,” Mr. Clemens hugged his lawyers and his wife. He huddled with his sons, who wept with relief. His lead lawyer, Rusty Hardin, said: “We’ve waited a long time for this. Long time coming.”Mr. Clemens, 49 and a seven-time winner of the Cy Young Award as the best pitcher in his league, had been charged with one count of obstructing Congress, three counts of making false statements and two counts of perjury in connection with his testimony to a House committee about whether he used drugs. If Mr. Clemens had been convicted on all counts, he would have faced up to 30 years in federal prison. Photo Credit: (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Clemens Is Found Not Guilty in Perjury Trial

Roger Clemens, who intimidated even the toughest batters while becoming one of the best pitchers in baseball history, was acquitted Monday of all charges that he lied to Congress in 2008 when he insisted he never used steroids or human growth hormone during his long career.

The verdict, which came on the second full day of deliberations in United States District Court, was a significant defeat for the government in its second failed attempt at convicting Mr. Clemens and will most likely fuel criticism of government prosecutors for investing time and money in cases involving athletes accused of doping.

As the six counts of not guilty were announced in the packed courtroom, Mr. Clemens bit his lip and appeared to wipe tears from his eyes. After the judge said, “Mr. Clemens, you are free to go,” Mr. Clemens hugged his lawyers and his wife. He huddled with his sons, who wept with relief. His lead lawyer, Rusty Hardin, said: “We’ve waited a long time for this. Long time coming.”

Mr. Clemens, 49 and a seven-time winner of the Cy Young Award as the best pitcher in his league, had been charged with one count of obstructing Congress, three counts of making false statements and two counts of perjury in connection with his testimony to a House committee about whether he used drugs. If Mr. Clemens had been convicted on all counts, he would have faced up to 30 years in federal prison.

Photo Credit: (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)