Cybersecurity bills aim to prevent ‘digital Pearl Harbor’Cybercrime isn’t just a threat to your bank account or personal computer — it’s an issue of national security.Foreign spies and organized criminals are inside of virtually every U.S. company’s network. The government’s top cybersecurity advisors widely agree that cyber criminals or terrorists have the capability to take down the country’s critical financial, energy or communications infrastructure."The reality is that our infrastructure is being colonized," said Tom Kellerman, former commissioner of President Obama’s cyber security council, at a Bloomberg cybersecurity conference held in New York last week. "The terrifying thing is that governments no longer have a monopoly on this capability. There is code out there that puts it in anyone’s hands."Using cyberspace to take over our infrastructure, turn off our electricity or release toxins would amount to “a digital Pearl Harbor,” Richard Clarke, the coordinator of President George W. Bush’s counterterrorism initiative, famously said in 2009.Staving off such an event is a logistical nightmare.Photo Credit: (Jim Watson/Getty Images)

Cybersecurity bills aim to prevent ‘digital Pearl Harbor’

Cybercrime isn’t just a threat to your bank account or personal computer — it’s an issue of national security.

Foreign spies and organized criminals are inside of virtually every U.S. company’s network. The government’s top cybersecurity advisors widely agree that cyber criminals or terrorists have the capability to take down the country’s critical financial, energy or communications infrastructure.

"The reality is that our infrastructure is being colonized," said Tom Kellerman, former commissioner of President Obama’s cyber security council, at a Bloomberg cybersecurity conference held in New York last week. "The terrifying thing is that governments no longer have a monopoly on this capability. There is code out there that puts it in anyone’s hands."

Using cyberspace to take over our infrastructure, turn off our electricity or release toxins would amount to “a digital Pearl Harbor,” Richard Clarke, the coordinator of President George W. Bush’s counterterrorism initiative, famously said in 2009.

Staving off such an event is a logistical nightmare.

Photo Credit: (Jim Watson/Getty Images)