Occupy Protests Shift Focus From Encampments to Reclaiming Foreclosed Homes 
The Occupy Wall Street  protests are moving into the neighborhood. Finding it increasingly  difficult to camp in public spaces, Occupy protesters across the country  are reclaiming foreclosed homes and boarded-up properties, signaling a  tactical shift for the movement against wealth inequality.
Groups in more than 25 cities held protests Tuesday on behalf of homeowners facing evictions.
In  Atlanta, protesters held a boisterous rally at a county courthouse and  used whistles and sirens to disrupt an auction of seized houses. In New  York, they marched through a residential neighborhood in Brooklyn  carrying signs that read “Foreclose on banks, not people.” Southern  California protesters rallied around a family of six that reclaimed the  home they lost six months ago in foreclosure.
"It’s  pretty clear that the fight is against the banks, and the Occupy  movement is about occupying spaces. So occupying a space that should  belong to homeowners but belongs to the banks seems like the logical  next step for the Occupy movement," said Jeff Ordower, one of the  organizers of Occupy Homes.
The events reflect  the protesters’ lingering frustration over the housing crisis that has  sent millions of homes into foreclosure after the burst of the housing  bubble that helped cripple the country’s economy. Nearly a quarter of  all U.S. homeowners with mortgages are now underwater, representing  nearly 11 million homes, according to CoreLogic, a real estate research  firm.
Photo Credit: (presstv)

Occupy Protests Shift Focus From Encampments to Reclaiming Foreclosed Homes


The Occupy Wall Street protests are moving into the neighborhood. Finding it increasingly difficult to camp in public spaces, Occupy protesters across the country are reclaiming foreclosed homes and boarded-up properties, signaling a tactical shift for the movement against wealth inequality.

Groups in more than 25 cities held protests Tuesday on behalf of homeowners facing evictions.

In Atlanta, protesters held a boisterous rally at a county courthouse and used whistles and sirens to disrupt an auction of seized houses. In New York, they marched through a residential neighborhood in Brooklyn carrying signs that read “Foreclose on banks, not people.” Southern California protesters rallied around a family of six that reclaimed the home they lost six months ago in foreclosure.

"It’s pretty clear that the fight is against the banks, and the Occupy movement is about occupying spaces. So occupying a space that should belong to homeowners but belongs to the banks seems like the logical next step for the Occupy movement," said Jeff Ordower, one of the organizers of Occupy Homes.

The events reflect the protesters’ lingering frustration over the housing crisis that has sent millions of homes into foreclosure after the burst of the housing bubble that helped cripple the country’s economy. Nearly a quarter of all U.S. homeowners with mortgages are now underwater, representing nearly 11 million homes, according to CoreLogic, a real estate research firm.

Photo Credit: (presstv)